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Context of 'January 2009: Japan’s Industrial Production Falls 10 Percent in January 2009'

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1963: Japan Installs Huge PV Array on Lighthouse

Japan installs a 242-watt, photovoltaic array on a lighthouse. It is at the time the world’s largest array. [US Department of Energy, 2002 pdf file]

Timeline Tags: US Solar Industry

The annual summit of the G-8 nations, an informal association of the Northern Hemisphere’s eight largest industrialized nations—Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, Britain, and the United States—concludes with what Vanity Fair will call “a tepid pledge to cut greenhouse gases by 50 percent by the year 2050.” President Bush lets his feelings about global warming and the US’s role in dealing with the issue show when, bidding farewell to his fellow heads of state, he says, “Goodbye from the world’s greatest polluter.” [Vanity Fair, 2/2009]

Entity Tags: George W. Bush

Timeline Tags: US Environmental Record, Global Warming

According to a report published in February 2009 by the Japanese government, Japan’s economy—the world’s second largest—suffers the biggest monthly drop since records began more than half a century ago, with January marking the fourth successive month that factory output has fallen. Officials conclude that the country is in its worst recession in decades. The figures are published days after government reports that exports plunged nearly 46 percent in comparison to a year ago, reportedly suffering from a fall in foreign product demand. A preliminary report by the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry predicts that output will further fall to 8.3 percent in February, but increase in March by 2.8 percent. The report concludes that a 17.3 percent production drop in transport equipment, including cars and trucks, had the largest negative impact on the overall output decline, and that electronic parts and devices was down 21.8 percent from December, followed next by general machinery and steel, with all 16 industrial areas cutting their output. According to the Japan Automobile Manufacturers’ Association, the country’s car production plunges a record 41 percent in January and vehicle productions decrease by nearly 50 percent to 576,539 vehicles produced in January 2009 compared with 976,975 in January 2008. “Fearful of losing their jobs in the global turndown, consumers no longer want to buy Japanese electronic gadgets and cars,” says Roland Buerk of BBC Tokyo. “The Japanese are shopping less and average household spending fell 5.9 percent in January compared with the same month a year ago.” Jobs are also being slashed, with unemployment rising by more than 200,000 in January 2009. “Japan was once seen as relatively immune to the global crisis because its banks were not as exposed to bad loans as those in the US and Europe,” Buerk will say. “Their reliance on foreign markets to drive its economy out of a long slump in the 1990s has left it painfully exposed.” “The recession is having an increasing impact on the real economy,” Finance Minister Kaoru Yosano will say. [BBC, 2/27/2009; Xinhua News Agency (Beijing), 2/27/2009]

Entity Tags: Roland Buerk, Kaoru Yosano, British Broadcasting Corporation, Japan Automobile Manufacturers’ Association

Timeline Tags: Global Economic Crises

Official numbers released today show that the US economy fell by 6.2 percent during the fourth quarter of 2008. The decline was much worse than analysts initially predicted, sending US stocks spiraling lower. “Plunging exports and the biggest fall in consumer spending in 28 years dragged the annualized figure down from the preliminary estimate of 3.8 percent,” the BBC reports. As a whole, in 2008, the economy grew at its slowest pace since 2001, posting a mere 1.1 percent growth. The blue-chip Dow Jones industrial average dropped 119.15 points, or 1.66 percent, to 7,062.93. The broader Standard & Poor’s 500 Index fell 2.36 percent to 735.09, a 12-year low. US consumer spending accounts for nearly two-thirds of domestic economic activity, but fell by a rate of 4.3 percent in the final quarter—the biggest fall since the second quarter of 1980. This was a revision of the earlier figure of 3.5 percent. Rising unemployment, sliding home values, increasing numbers of repossessions, and the slumping value of investments indicate that many US consumers are hanging on to disposable cash. US exports fell at the sharpest rate since 1970 at an annual rate of 23.6 percent, down from 19.7 percent. Prior to the current economic crunch, exports supported the economy. “It shows the weak state of the world’s largest economy,” says Matt Esteve, a currency trader at Tempus Consulting. “Latest GDP figures are just awful and illustrates the weak state of the world’s largest economy.” Boris Schlossberg, director of currency research at GFT Forex, adds, “There is doom all over,” but predicts that the dollar would not weaken too much against the euro since “there’s no good news on the other side of the Atlantic, either.” [BBC, 2/27/2009]

Entity Tags: GFT Forex, Dow Jones Industrial Average, Matt Esteve, Standard & Poor’s, Tempus Consulting, Boris Schlossberg

Timeline Tags: Global Economic Crises

The jobless rate in Britain climbs to its highest level since 1995, according to the Office of National Statistics in London. The number of people out of work hits 2.47 million, while unemployment claims rise to 1.61 million for the month of July. Data recently released by the statistics office indicate that unemployment through July rose to 7.9 percent, the most since 1996, compared to the European Union’s latest figure of 9.5 percent, 9.7 percent in the US, and 5.7 percent in Japan. Bank of England Governor Mervyn King says that even after the economy stops shrinking, households will continue feeling the recession’s pain, since “unemployment is either going to continue rising or remain high.” As much as £175 billion ($288 billion) is being printed to aid economic growth and avoid deflation. “If anything, the UK economy is only just emerging from recession, and this is a lagging indicator,” says economist Philip Shaw of London’s Investec Securities. “We’re looking at unemployment peaking towards the middle of next year. Things are likely to improve at a slow rate, but it’s likely to remain uncomfortable for a long time.” Employment minister Jim Knight tells BBC News: “Unemployment still remains a real problem for families up and down the country. We’ve got to keep the support going and not be tempted to celebrate the recovery.” In speaking on the recovery, Prime Minister Gordon Brown—up for re-election in 2010—says the economic rebound “is still fragile” and stimulus programs that boost the economy should be maintained. “There are no signs of recovery here,” Trades Union Congress General Secretary Brendan Barber says. “It might look rosier in city dealing rooms but, out in the real world, unemployment is the number one issue.” [Bloomberg, 9/16/2009]

Entity Tags: Investec Securities, Bank of England, Brendan Barber, European Union, Gordon Brown, United Kingdom, Office for National Statistics, Mervyn King, Jim Knight

Timeline Tags: Global Economic Crises

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