The Center for Grassroots Oversight

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Context of '2000: Louisiana Coastal Population Reaches 2 Million; New Orleans Metro Area Population is 1.34 Million'

This is a scalable context timeline. It contains events related to the event 2000: Louisiana Coastal Population Reaches 2 Million; New Orleans Metro Area Population is 1.34 Million. You can narrow or broaden the context of this timeline by adjusting the zoom level. The lower the scale, the more relevant the items on average will be, while the higher the scale, the less relevant the items, on average, will be.

The population of the New Orleans metro area is 987,695. (CensusScope (.org) 9/15/2005)

The population of the New Orleans metro area is 1,144,791. (CensusScope (.org) 9/15/2005)

The population of the New Orleans metro area is 1,303,800. (CensusScope (.org) 9/15/2005)

The population of the New Orleans metro area is 1,285,270. (CensusScope (.org) 9/15/2005)

The population of Louisiana’s coastal parishes reaches 2 million, or 46 percent of the state’s entire population. (US Army Corp of Engineers 11/8/2004, pp. ii) The population of the New Orleans metro area is 1,337,726. (CensusScope (.org) 9/15/2005)

A coalition of governmental agencies, elected officials, environmental organizations, and community groups launch a campaign to increase public awareness about Louisiana’s disappearing coastal wetlands. The campaign—backed with a $3 million grant from Shell Oil, one of the campaign’s partners—is called “America’s Wetland.” The impact of the wetlands’ disappearance on Louisiana’s coastal ecology has been the focus of environmentalists and scientists for years. And scientists have also been warning that the loss of the state’s coastal wetlands and barrier islands has made coastal population centers such as New Orleans increasingly susceptible to hurricane-generated storm surges that could cause massive flooding. What’s unique about this program is that it stresses how the loss of wetlands will impact the oil industry and national economy. The campaign argues that coastal erosion is threatening the oil companies’ network of oil and natural gas rigs, pipelines, and refineries throughout the region. Losing this infrastructure would result in higher oil prices. Furthermore, the state’s fisheries—which make up 30 percent of the nation’s total annual catch—are also vulnerable. “The coast is really about money, aside from the ecological value of it,” explains outgoing Republican Governor Mike Foster, who played a major role in the campaign’s formation. (Burdeau 6/6/2004; Americas Wetlands 9/21/2005)


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