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US Domestic Terrorism

Law Enforcement Actions

Project: US Domestic Terrorism
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ANSWP leader Bill White giving a Nazi salute.ANSWP leader Bill White giving a Nazi salute. [Source: SPLC / Roanoke Times]Bill White, the leader of the American National Socialist Workers Party (ANSWP), is convicted in Roanoke, Virginia, of issuing death threats to several people, including Citibank employee Jennifer Petsche, a university administrator, and a human rights lawyer, and of intimidating tenants in Virginia Beach who had filed a lawsuit against their landlord. A judge will dismiss the charge of threatening the lawyer, but will uphold the other convictions. On March 22, 2007, White left a voicemail message for Petsche on her home phone informing her of his identity and saying that he had sent her an email concerning a credit card dispute he was having with Citibank. The email contained her current and former address, including the location of her parents’ home, and compared her to Chicago judge Joan Humphrey Lefkow, whose husband and mother were murdered (see February 28, 2005) after a neo-Nazi had posted Lefkow’s home address on a Web site. “I must admit I have run out of patience with you and your smug attitude,” White wrote. “I hope the fact that I’ve obviously paid someone to find you conveys the seriousness with which I take your current attitude.” Petsche informed authorities and White was placed under surveillance. White was arrested in October 2008; his arrest forced the shutdown of the ANSWP blog and led to the collapse of the entire organization, which in 2008 had 35 chapters in 28 states. Before his trial, White complained that “the federal government has launched a massive effort to ‘decapitate’ white organizations.” During his trial, White was found to have posted personal information on a large number of persons on the ANSWP Web site, in many cases calling for his followers to track them down and attack them. Brian Levin of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism says: “We live in a world where rhetoric is increasingly tilting toward violence, where extremists are becoming adept at going up to the line but not crossing it. The law is struggling to untangle protected hate speech from unprotected violence and threats, which often come in the same package. These trials put hate-mongers on notice: If they target their venom too narrowly, too violently, and too explicitly, they run the risk of crossing from political discourse to prison.” White has used the Internet to harass and threaten people since 1996, when he posted the name and phone number of a woman whom he believed was abusing her teenage daughter. “You should be able to write what you want on the Internet, whether it’s true or not,” he told a reporter at the time. For years, White ran Overthrow.com, a popular neo-Nazi Web site. In September 2007, after six black teenagers beat a white teenager in Jena, Louisiana, he posted five of their addresses and phone numbers under a banner that proclaimed, “Lynch the Jena 6!” He advised his readers to “get in touch and let them know justice is coming.” Local police provided the teens’ families with protection. White has long posted virulently racist material on his Web site, frequently using racial slurs and calling African-Americans “nig-rats” and “vermin.” White did not restrict his rhetoric to blacks; in 2007, he advocated the assassination of George W. Bush, writing that “a well-placed bullet can solve a lot of problems,” and has advised that “we need to start SHOOTING AND KILLING Mexicans as they cross the border.” [Southern Poverty Law Center, 3/2010]

Entity Tags: William Alexander (“Bill”) White, American National Socialist Workers Party, Joan Humphrey Lefkow, Brian Levin, George W. Bush, Jennifer Petsche

Category Tags: Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action, Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Court Actions and Lawsuits, Law Enforcement Actions, Other Militias, Separatists, Rhetorical Violence

A Hutaree logo depicted on a shoulder patch. The initials CCR stand for ‘Colonial Christian Republic.’A Hutaree logo depicted on a shoulder patch. The initials CCR stand for ‘Colonial Christian Republic.’ [Source: BBC]Nine members of the “Hutaree,” a radical-right Christian militia organization, are charged with conspiring to kill police officers and wage war against the US. The FBI has arrested the nine members—eight men and one women—from locations throughout the Midwest, and are still searching for a tenth member, and charge them with “seditious conspiracy” and other crimes. The FBI alleges that the Hutaree members planned to kill a police officer in Michigan and then stage a second attack on the funeral, using landmines and roadside bombs or IEDs (improvised explosive devices). The arrests come after an 18-month investigation and a series of FBI raids on properties in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana, after concluding that the group was planning a reconnaissance exercise. Attorney General Eric Holder says: “The indictment… outlines an insidious plan by anti-government extremists to murder a law enforcement officer in order to lure police from across the nation to the funeral where they would be attacked with explosive devices. Thankfully, this alleged plot has been thwarted and a severe blow has been dealt to a dangerous organisation that today stands accused of conspiring to levy war against the United States.” [CNN, 3/28/2010; Christian Science Monitor, 3/29/2010; BBC, 3/30/2010; Newsweek, 4/12/2010] The nine arrested are David Brian Stone of Clayton, Michigan, the leader of the group; David Brian Stone Jr. of Adrian, Michigan; Joshua Matthew Stone of Clayton; Tina Mae Stone of Clayton; Joshua John Clough of Blissfield, Michigan; Michael David Meeks of Manchester, Michigan; Kristopher T. Sickles of Sandusky, Ohio; Jacob J. Ward of Huron, Ohio; and Thomas W. Piatek of Hammond, Indiana. The FBI recovers 46 guns, two .50-caliber rifles, and 13,000 rounds of ammunition from Piatek’s home. All are denied bail in federal court. [Indiana Post-Tribune, 4/4/2010]
FBI Alerted of 'Trouble' in 2009 - The indictment cites “a cooperating witness and an undercover FBI agent”; the Detroit News reports that one of the nine defendants, through her lawyer, says she believes a member of another militia group reported the Hutaree’s plans to the FBI. [Christian Science Monitor, 3/31/2010] It will later emerge that in 2009, residents of Adrian, Michigan, contacted the FBI over their concerns that Stone was planning something violent. Even local militia members were worried, and one militia member decided to infiltrate the group on behalf of the FBI. In the fall of 2009, the FBI learned that the Hutarees were building bombs, and the bureau sent its own undercover agent inside the group. The undercover agent actually offered to make the bombs; senior FBI agent Andrew Arena says that the benefit of that offer was in placing the FBI in charge of the explosives. “We were very fortunate to be able to insert an individual who was able to kind of take that role,” Arena says. “It certainly let me sleep a little better at night.” The agent went to meetings with surveillance devices to make audio recordings of the proceedings, and taped a February 2010 conversation in which Stone declared that he was sure local police “would fight right alongside some Chinese trooper. Heck, yeah. It’s all about power. It’s about the authority. They see us as the little people.” Stone and the other members of his group believe that the US government is planning on using foreign troops to impose martial law and tyranny on American citizens. During the same conversation, in which Stone read a speech he planned to give at an upcoming militia gathering in Kentucky, Stone said: “Now, we need to quit playing this game with these elitist terrorists and actually get serious, because this war will come whether we are ready or not. A war of this magnitude will not be easy. But like the rattlesnake on the Gadsden flag, we have rattled and warned the new world order (see September 11, 1990). Now it’s time to strike and take our nation back.” Arena says that while Stone has the constitutional right to say such things, “when you start taking action towards that government,” a citizen crosses the line into conspiracy to commit a crime. “In this case, we’re defining it as they started to plan how they were going to ignite the war.” When another Hutaree member asked for the help of a local militia headed by David Servino in building bombs and planning attacks, Servino says, “[w]e talked about it, and we decided as a group to go to the State Police Department—this local here—and talk to them, tell them what little information we had.” A day after Servino’s group informed the state police, the FBI began making its arrests. [National Public Radio, 4/12/2010]
Extremist, Violent Ideology - A Hutaree Web site shows video footage of military-style training exercises and describes the members as “Christian warriors.” The site tells visitors that the Hutaree are preparing to defend themselves upon the arrival of the Antichrist, “for the end time battles to keep the testimony of Jesus Christ alive.… The Hutaree will one day see its enemy and meet him on the battlefield if so God wills it.” The FBI describes the Hutaree as an “anti-government extremist organization” advocating violence against the police in its indictment of the members; the group perceives the police as an arm of the US government [CNN, 3/28/2010; Christian Science Monitor, 3/29/2010; BBC, 3/30/2010] , which it calls ZOG—the “Zionist Occupied Government.” There is some dispute in the media as to the origin of the name “Hutaree.” One source believes it may originate from the word “Hutriel,” which translates to “rod of God.” Hutriel is one of the seven angels of punishment and helps in the “punishment of the 10 nations,” according to tradition. [Basil and Spice (.com), 4/6/2010] They label the police “the Brotherhood.” According to the Michigan Hutaree theology, which they call “the doctrine of the Hutaree,” former NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana is the Antichrist. The Hutaree’s exalted commander is called a “radok”; deputies and lieutenants are known as “boromanders” and “zulifs.” [Newsweek, 4/12/2010] Stone’s ex-fiancee, Andrea March, recalls Stone as a “Ron Paul fanatic,” referring to Ron Paul (R-TX) the libertarian House member whom many see as an ideological “father” of many “tea party” organizations. Appearing on Fox News, March tells an interviewer that Stone is a fanatical Paul supporter who feared that President Obama intended to take away his guns. “When Obama took the presidency is when he lost it because he was a Ron Paul fanatic,” she says. Asked what Paul has to do with Stone’s thinking and actions, she replies: “To tell you the truth I don’t know. I never really understood why Ron Paul was so much different, but [Stone] thought he could get away with anything and he wanted more freedoms than what he had and he was trying to do it through the violence.… [H]e clearly believed in guns and having them and he didn’t think. He didn’t want to have a driver’s license, he didn’t want to fill out any census papers. He wanted to own guns unregistered.” [Crooks and Liars, 3/30/2010]
Leader, Group Well Known for Violent Expressions - The group leader, Stone, is called “Captain Hutaree” by his colleagues, or, cryptically, “RD.” The indictment names Stone as the “principal leader” of the organization. According to media reports, Stone has a strong affinity for the most violent of the far-right fringes of the American militia movement. His first wife, Donna Stone, tells reporters she left him because he “got carried away.” Federal authorities say that he researched how to build IEDs and roadside bombs on the Internet, and emailed diagrams of the devices to someone he believed could actually build such devices. And one neighbor, Phyllis Bruger, says she and others learned not to “mess with” Stone and his group. They liked to conduct “military exercises” and shoot guns, usually wearing camouflage outfits. “Everybody knew they were militia,” she says. Donna Stone tells reporters: “It started out as a Christian thing. You go to church. You pray. You take care of your family. I think David started to take it a little too far. He dragged a lot of people with him. When he got carried away, when he went from handguns to big guns, I was done.” Her son, Joshua Stone, who was adopted by David Stone, was arrested with David Stone after helping him gather materials necessary for making the bombs. Donna Stone adds: “He dragged a lot of innocent people down with him. It started to get worse when they were talking about the world’s gonna end in the Bible.” The indictment says, “Stone taught other Hutaree members how to make and use explosive devices intending or knowing that the information would be used to further a crime of violence.”
Too Far for Other Militia Groups - Other militia organizations in Michigan kept their distance from the local Hutaree, says Jim Gulliksen of the Lenawee Volunteer Michigan Militia (the same group that Servino founded and that informed police of the Hutaree plot). “I’ve met him,” Gulliksen says. “He’s an opinionated man who likes to share those opinions. The Hutaree is a nationwide group, but I have met a couple of the members here, and I can say they all belong to one specific church. Our concern is the protection of our nation. Religion appears to be a big part of what they are doing.” Heidi Beirich of the Southern Poverty Law Center says the SPLC is aware of two Hutaree chapters, one in Utah and Stone’s chapter in Michigan. She notes Hutaree has more than 350 friends on its MySpace page, dozens of whom are members of other militias, and says that Stone was planning to attend a summit in Kentucky with other militias next month. “Hutaree is not an isolated crew,” she notes. Beinrich says that Stone and his colleagues see “the end of times” occurring today: “They have extreme antigovernment beliefs. They have rage and hatred for the federal government. They fear being put in FEMA concentration camps. They’re really paramilitary organizations.” [Christian Science Monitor, 3/29/2010] William Flatt, a founder of the Indiana Militia, is also aware of Stone and the Hutaree. He is not surprised at the arrests. “We had a strong suspicion that groups like this would be getting some rather substantial bad press fairly quickly,” Flatt tells a reporter. Flatt says that unlike the Hutaree, his and most militia groups support and defend the US Constitution. “The whole militia movement is supposed to be a goal-line defense against tyranny,” Flatt says. “If all else fails, the people still have the means to shoehorn [the government] back into the constitutional mold.” The Michigan Hutaree’s plans to kill police officers, Flatt says, is abhorrent to his group, and he warns that it is a mistake to lump all American militias in with extremist, violent groups such as Stone’s. Flatt disliked Stone’s views, which he says focus on his interpretation of Christianity and also express bigotry against others. However, he is skeptical of the charges against some of Stone’s followers. “The charges they’re putting out there, it only ends one way,” he says. “You might as well put yourself in the Alamo; nobody wants to do that.” [Indiana Post-Tribune, 4/4/2010] Arena says that while Stone’s group might have considered itself a part of a larger, sympathetic coterie of like-minded organizations, it was mistaken. “These guys may have felt in their mind that they were a part of this brotherhood,” he says. “The reality is I don’t think they’ve got a whole lot of support.” [Associated Press, 4/2/2010]
Lawyer Insists No Crime Committed - Stone’s lawyer, William Swor, says there is no evidence the group ever took steps to implement any of the alleged plots. Instead, he says, the group is being persecuted over the exercise of constitutionally protected speech. “This is still America and people can say whatever they want,” he says. [Newsweek, 4/12/2010]

Byron Williams, in a photo taken shortly after his arrest.Byron Williams, in a photo taken shortly after his arrest. [Source: CBS News]California resident Byron Williams opens fire on Highway Patrol officers after being stopped on an Oakland freeway. Williams is wearing body armor and carrying multiple firearms, including a .308-caliber rifle using armor-piercing rounds. The officers stopped Williams after observing him speeding and weaving through traffic, and Williams opens fire on the officers. Ten Highway Patrol officers ultimately converge on the scene. Williams survives the 12-minute shootout, but is struck several times by police bullets; he inflicts minor injuries on two officers. Williams is a convicted felon who was released from jail two years ago after serving a sentence for bank robbery. His mother, Janice Williams, says he has had a difficult time getting his life together after being released from prison. Mrs. Williams also says her son is extremely angry with the US government. She says: “He’s been upset with the direction the country is going. He feels the people of this country are being raped by our government and politicians.” Williams blames “liberals” in government for making it difficult for him to find a job. Evidence taken from Williams’s truck, and a subsequent interview with Williams, show that he intended to “start a revolution” by killing liberal activists in San Francisco. Williams admits to planning on murdering people at the San Francisco offices of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Tides Foundation, an organization that promotes progressive social causes. Oakland police spokesman Jeff Thomason says Williams targeted the two nonprofit organizations because of their political ideologies. “Retribution was called for with Tides or anyone working for George Soros [a billionaire known for funding progressive causes] (see August 8, 2006 and February 2007) by taking out 11 people,” Williams says, and adds that he chose to murder 11 people in retribution for the 11 workers killed in the April 2010 oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico. Williams says of his intentions to murder: “I regret it only because of the conditions I’m in and the pain that I’ve put on my mother. But I am 100 percent convinced that we cannot beat the system of corruption.” The Tides Foundation says in a statement, “This is a reminder of the intolerant climate that has been created by the demagogues and fear-mongering pundits of the right wing.” [KXTV, 7/18/2010; Associated Press, 7/21/2010; KGO-TV, 9/15/2010; Media Matters, 10/11/2010] In a jailhouse interview, Williams will say that much of his political thinking was sparked by Fox News commentator Glenn Beck (see October 11, 2010).

Entity Tags: Tides Foundation, George Soros, Byron Williams, American Civil Liberties Union, Janice Williams, Jeff Thomason, Glenn Beck

Category Tags: Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action, Law Enforcement Actions, Shooting/Guns

Justin Carl Moose.Justin Carl Moose. [Source: Christian Nightmares (.com)]The FBI arrests anti-abortion activist Justin Carl Moose and charges him with describing how to make explosives in an attempt to bomb an abortion clinic. Moose, an unemployed father of three, lives in Concord, North Carolina, just outside Charlotte; he posted the information on his Facebook page. Moose calls himself an “extremist,” a “radical,” and the “Christian counterpart of Osama bin Laden,” according to FBI agents, and labels himself a member of the violent anti-abortion group Army of God (AOG—see 1982). The FBI became aware of Moose after being alerted to his Facebook postings by pro-choice organization Planned Parenthood, which told the agency it worried that Moose was advocating extreme violence against abortion providers. The FBI began monitoring the page, and last week read of Moose’s collaboration with an FBI informant to bomb a clinic in North Carolina. Moose faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted on federal charges of distribution of information relating to explosives. Moose’s Facebook page also rails against abortion doctors, President Obama’s health care reform plan, and reports of a mosque to be built near the site of the World Trade Center. Moose also wrote several posts in support of those who have killed abortion providers in the past. “Whatever you may think about me, you’re probably right,” he wrote. “Extremist, Radical, Fundamentalist…? Yep! Terrorist…? Well, I prefer the term ‘freedom Fighter.’”
Facebook Postings since March 2010 - In March 2010, after Congress voted to pass health care legislation, Moose wrote: “The Death Care Bill passed last night. Keep your phone and rifle close and wait.” In May 2010, he wrote, “There are few problems in life that can’t be solved with the proper application of high explosives :)” In July 2010, he wrote: “If a mosque is built on ground zero, it will be removed. Oklahoma City style. Tim’s not the only man out there that knows how to do it.” Moose was referring to Timothy McVeigh, the person responsible for destroying a federal building in Oklahoma City (see 8:35 a.m. - 9:02 a.m. April 19, 1995). Other posts included the phrases, “Save a life, shoot an abortionist”; “Make a bomb and light the fuse, another Hero in the news. The monster dead, with hole in head. His end was made and babies were saved”; and: “Calling all Tim McVeighs and Eric Rudolphs (see January 29, 1998)! We must take the war to the enemies of freedom and retaliate with all due force.” In August 2010, Moose posted detailed instructions for making TATP, an acronym for an explosive, such as that used by terrorists in the July 2005 London bombings (see July 7, 2005). After the FBI read those instructions, it obtained legal permission to read Moose’s private messages; one Moose posted to a fellow anti-abortion activist read: “I have learned a lot from the Muslim terrorists and I have no problems using their tactics. People say sarcastically ‘what’s the difference between a Christian terrorist and an Islamic terrorist?’ I tell them simply that I’m right and I serve a living God! THAT’S the difference.” On September 3, a confidential FBI informant told Moose in a recorded phone call that his best friend’s wife was about to have an abortion. Moose quickly responded: “Say no more. I understand and I can help.” The two men met the next day at a local restaurant, where Moose described several bombs that the confidential informant could make to destroy the abortion clinic his friend’s wife was planning to use. Moose also described what he called “surveillance tactics” to be employed against the clinic, including his recommendation to drink some beer and stagger around the clinic pretending to be drunk. On September 5, the informant told Moose he had obtained the materials to make TATP; Moose told him the process for making the explosive. The FBI arrests Moose two days later. [Charlotte Observer, 9/9/2010; US Department of Justice, 9/9/2010 pdf file; Women's Rights, 9/19/2010]
Media Fails to Report Moose's Actions, Plans as Terrorism - The Women’s Rights blog will note “that not one major news outlet referred to this as terrorism, despite the fact that systematically using violence and harassment to prevent citizens from providing or obtaining constitutionally-protected health care literally defines the term (which even the government reluctantly recognizes).… In the news covering this particular incident, the only reference to terrorism in any mainstream story came from Moose’s direct quotes… talking about himself. Look guys, if the dude in question essentially calls himself a terrorist and you can’t bring yourselves to follow suit, you’re either the world’s crappiest journalists or way too afraid of offending people who, quite frankly, deserve to be offended.… The unwillingness to admit that terrorism knows no racial or religious bounds is not a minor, meaningless discrepancy. Words matter, and our refusal to decry violent Christian and/or anti choice terrorism with the same fury we typically reserve only for Islamic fundamentalists both exemplifies and contributes to a culture where racism, religious discrimination, and violence against women and women’s rights is tolerated. It’s completely and totally unacceptable.” [Women's Rights, 9/19/2010]

Entity Tags: Planned Parenthood, Women’s Rights (.org), Justin Carl Moose, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Army of God

Category Tags: Abortion-Based Rhetoric and Actions, Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action, Law Enforcement Actions, Arson, Rhetorical Violence

Jadon Higganbothan before his murder.Jadon Higganbothan before his murder. [Source: WRAL-TV]A four-year-old boy and a 28-year-old woman are killed, apparently through their contact with a small North Carolina religious cult. Peter Lucas Moses, the head of a “family” made up of four women and nine children, is charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of four-year-old Jadon Higganbothan and 28-year-old Antoinetta Yvonne McKoy; prosecutors say they will seek the death penalty. Group members, all women and children, call Moses “Lord” and reportedly fear him. Prosecutors say Moses killed Higganbothan because he believed the child “act[s] gay,” and McKoy because she found out she could not bear children and wanted to leave the group’s home in Durham, North Carolina. In February 2011, a woman escapes from the group’s home and contacts police. Her identity is not made public. She lived at the home with Moses, Higganbothan, McKoy, and three other women also charged in the slayings: Higganbothan’s mother, Vania Rae Sisk, 25, Lavada Quinzetta Harris, 40, and Larhonda Renee Smith, 40. Sisk, Lavada Harris, and Smith face first-degree murder charges in McKoy’s death and charges as accessories in Higganbothan’s death. Investigators believe some of those involved in the deaths are members of a religious sect known as the Black Hebrews, which claims it descends directly from the ancient tribes of Israel. The unnamed woman informs police that two people were killed in the house. Court records show that police had a confidential informant in the case. The women call themselves “wives or common-law wives” of Moses, according to Durham County District Attorney Tracey Cline. “The arrangement was the women would periodically occupy the master suite with” Moses. Cline refuses to call the group a cult. Moses is the father of all the children except for Higganbothan; according to prosecutors, Moses feared that Higganbothan might be gay because his father had left Sisk, and Moses told her to “get rid” of the child. “In the religious belief of that organization, homosexuality was frowned on,” Cline says. In October 2010, Moses becomes incensed after learning that Higganbothan had struck another child in the rear, begins screaming, “I told you to get rid of him!” begins playing loud music, takes Higganbothan into the garage, and shoots him in the head. The women put the child’s body into a suitcase and place the suitcase in Moses’s master suite; he later orders the women to remove the suitcase because it is beginning to smell. On December 21 or 22, prosecutors will say, McKoy is also murdered by Moses. She attempts to go to a neighbor’s house and call her mother in Washington, DC, but Moses drags her back to their home and beats her throughout the day, sometimes joined by some of the other women. He then attempts to strangle her with an extension cord, and finally takes her into the bathroom and shoots her to death. The neighbor will later say she did not call police because she thought that it was a group home and that McKoy might be mentally disturbed. Prosecutors find diary entries written by McKoy begging “Lord” not to kill her. The group throws a party later in the week, and Moses displays McKoy’s corpse to several of his relatives, including his mother, brother, and sister, who are later charged as accessories in McKoy’s death. McKoy’s body is stored in a black plastic garbage bag. Eventually “family” members bury both bodies in the back yard of a house that was Moses’s mother’s former residence. Plumbers find the body in June 2011. Prosecutors find shell casings and blood in the garage and master bedroom of Moses’s house. They also find a .22-caliber gun matching the shells found in the house on the roof of a Colorado townhouse, where the “family” moves in February 2011. The other eight children, who say they feared Moses would do to them “what he did to Jadon,” according to Cline, are taken into foster care. McKoy’s mother, Yvonne McKoy, says she is still numb and cannot believe her daughter is gone. “I’m just grateful to God that justice has been served and God is going to do what God is going to do,” she says. [WRAL-TV, 7/8/2011; Associated Press, 7/8/2011]

Entity Tags: Larhonda Renee Smith, Black Hebrews, Antoinetta Yvonne McKoy, Jadon Higganbothan, Lavada Quinzetta Harris, Peter Lucas Moses, Vania Rae Sisk, Yvonne McKoy, Tracey Cline

Category Tags: Faith-Based Rhetoric and Actions, Gender-Based Rhetoric and Actions, Law Enforcement Actions, Beatings/Mobs, Shooting/Guns

Craig Cobb, a white supremacist (see October 31, 2005) hiding from a Canadian arrest warrant somewhere in the United States, calls on his supporters to launch violent attacks against Jews and US government installations, according to information from the SITE Intelligence Group, a terrorism monitoring group in Washington State. Cobb, whom authorities belive is in Montana, writes that he prefers his followers decide on “doing something they haven’t yet done before” for the white supremacist cause rather than offer him help. He cites three instances of violence as examples of the kind of action he is calling for: Joe Stack, who in 2010 crashed his Piper Dakota plane into a federal building in Austin, Texas, killing himself and an IRS manager (see February 18, 2010); James von Brunn, who shot a guard at the US Holocaust Museum (see June 10, 2009 and After); and Joseph Paul Franklin, a serial killer motivated by his hatred of African-Americans and Jews (see 1980). “History may turn” if a few more people conduct such attacks, Cobb writes. Terry Wilson of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) says of Cobb, “Money doesn’t motivate him at all; he only wants money to survive.” Cobb, through an intermediary, posts his message on the extremist Vanguard News Network. In other messages, he has taunted Wilson, telling the RCMP officer he could find Cobb “in the orange easy chair near the elevator at Flathead County Library, Kalispell, MT, 10-8 M-Th, or 11-5 Fridays and Saturdays, Terry.” Cobb operated his own “hate Web site” from Vancouver between mid-2009 and his arrest at the Vancouver Public Library in June 2010. Cobb fled to the United states hours after his arrest, as the RCMP was forced to release him because of a delay in filing federal hate-crime charges. He has been a fugitive from Canadian justice since them. Cobb was born in Missouri, gained dual Canadian citizenship after living in Canada in the 1970s, and began his white supremacist activities on the Internet in 2005, while living in Estonia. He was deported by Estonian authorities in August 2009, and then returned to Canada. Cobb has also encouraged his followers to join the Creativity Movement, another violent white supremacist organization (see 2009). He calls himself “The Orson Welles/Julian Assange of White Nationalism.” [CTV, 1/7/2011; Vancouver Sun, 1/26/2011]

Entity Tags: Vanguard News Network, Andrew Joseph Stack, Craig Cobb, James von Brunn, Joseph Paul Franklin, SITE Intelligence Group, World Church of the Creator, Terry Wilson

Category Tags: Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action, Faith-Based Rhetoric and Actions, Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Law Enforcement Actions, Other Militias, Separatists, Rhetorical Violence

An FBI photograph of the backpack containing the bomb.An FBI photograph of the backpack containing the bomb. [Source: FBI / TPM Muckraker]A “backpack bomb” is found planted on or next to a bench near the “Unity March” planned for downtown Spokane, Washington, as part of the scheduled Martin Luther King Jr. Day festivities. Three contract workers spot the black Swiss Army-brand backpack near a bench on the southeast corner of Washington Street and Main Avenue. The backpack contains a powerful bomb. Spokane police quickly reroute the march to avoid any potential danger. A bomb squad using remote-controlled robots successfully removes the bomb without detonating it. Officials later say the bomb is a sophisticated device which is designed to be detonated remotely, using something similar to a vehicle keyless entry switch; FBI officials call the bomb a “credible threat” to passersby and parade participants. The bomb, sources say, contains gunpowder and lead pellets, apparently designed to function as shrapnel. The bomb could have inflicted heavy casualties, and was placed in a way to maximize the blast toward marchers in the street. Other sources say that the bomb maker included rat poison in the bomb; most rat poisons contain warfarin, which would have caused wounded victims to bleed heavily once struck with shrapnel. Two T-shirts are stuffed around the bomb, in an apparent attempt to conceal it. Both have ties to Stevens County; one was distributed at a 2010 “Relay for Life” event in Colville, Washington, about an hour northwest of Spokane, and another, with the words “Treasure Island Spring 2009” on the front, was from a local theater production in 2009 in the town of Chewelah. Federal officials later call the bomb a thwarted attempt at domestic terrorism. The bomb is sent for testing to an FBI forensics lab in Quantico, Virginia. The Reverend Happy Walker, a featured speaker at the Unity March, later says: “People in New York City hear about Spokane and associate us with Hayden Lake and the Aryan Nations (see Early 1970s). It just shouldn’t be that way because it’s a great place to live. We’ve still got that hate that lingers and doesn’t go away. That’s disheartening.” [Seattle Times, 3/9/2010; KXLY, 1/18/2011; Spokane Spokesman-Review, 3/9/2011] Two days after the bomb is found, FBI special agent Frank Harrill will tell a reporter, “Clearly the confluence of the parade route, the timing, the fact that the device was likely placed on that route roughly an hour before the parade… falls squarely within the realm of domestic terrorism.” [TPM Muckraker, 1/19/2011] In March, alleged white supremacist Kevin Harpham will be arrested and charged with planting the bomb (see March 9, 2011). It is possible that Harpham may have planted the bomb in response to a call for violence from fugitive white supremacist Craig Cobb (see Around January 8, 2011).

Entity Tags: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Kevin William Harpham, Frank Harrill, Happy Walker

Category Tags: Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Law Enforcement Actions, Aryan Nations, National Alliance, Other Militias, Separatists, Bombs and Explosives

Kevin Harpham.Kevin Harpham. [Source: Seattle Times]Federal agents arrest ex-soldier Kevin William Harpham and charge him with planting a “backpack bomb” along the planned route of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day march in downtown Spokane, Washington (see January 17, 2011). Agents say that Harpham has ties to white supremacist groups; sources tell reporters that the FBI used DNA evidence and the purchases of electronic components to identify Harpham. He faces charges of attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction and possession of an unregistered explosive device, and if convicted could face life in prison. He is arrested without incident while driving near his home in rural Stevens County, northwest of Spokane and near the small town of Addy. According to information unearthed by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), an organization that monitors an array of hate groups and white supremacist organizations, in 2004 Harpham belonged to the neo-Nazi National Alliance (see 1970-1974). Former Aryan Nations leader Paul Mullet says that Harpham talked with him about joining his group in the mid-2000s, and said he had about a dozen conversations with Harpham. However, Mullet says, Harpham never joined the group. Harpham is a current member of the Vanguard News Network (VNN), a racist magazine for the National Alliance, which advocates the establishment of all-white communities. Evidence shows that Harpham has posted forum comments on VNN message boards both under his own name and apparently under the moniker “Joe Snuffy,” where he has asked about legal limits on ammunition possession and asked for help meeting local members of the American National Socialist Workers Party. In January 2011, he offered assistance to American neo-Nazi Craig Cobb, who days before the parade bombing called for his supporters to mount violent attacks (see Around January 8, 2011). SPLC director Mark Potok says, “What to me this arrest suggests is that the Martin Luther King Day attack is what it always looked like: A terror-mass murder attempt directed at black people and their sympathizers.” National Alliance chairman Erich Gliebe says Harpham is not a member of his organization, and says, “We have a zero tolerance policy regarding illegal activity and anyone committing those acts—even hinting or joking—would not be welcome in our organization.” Gliebe accuses the SPLC of trying to “smear” the National Alliance. Federal public defender Roger Peven, appointed to represent Harpham, says: “I know very little at this point. This is just the beginning of a long road.” Evidence against Harpham is scheduled to be presented to a grand jury on March 22, and if the jury indicts Harpham, he will be arraigned and a trial date set. Federal agents are in the process of searching Harpham’s trailer home; neighbors say they heard an explosion at the home, apparently set off by agents who breached Harpham’s front door. Investigators say they are not yet sure if others were involved in the attempted bombing. [Seattle Times, 3/9/2010; Spokane Spokesman-Review, 3/9/2011; TPM Muckraker, 3/10/2011] Investigators are looking into Harpham’s alleged neo-Nazi connections, they say, but as yet have not found evidence that Harpham colluded with any such groups or their members in making the bomb. They are looking at two recent neo-Nazi events held in Couer d’Alene, Idaho, 35 miles west of Spokane, to see if Harpham may have participated in the events or has connections with the participants. Tony Stewart of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations in Coeur d’Alene says that area is a “hotbed” of neo-Nazi and white supremacist activity. FBI officials are calling Harpham’s alleged bombing attempt an act of domestic terrorism. [CNN, 3/9/2011; KLXY, 3/9/2011; TPM Muckraker, 3/10/2011]

Entity Tags: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Erich Josef Gliebe, Aryan Nations, American National Socialist Workers Party, Vanguard News Network, Tony Stewart, Roger Peven, Craig Cobb, National Alliance, Southern Poverty Law Center, Mark Potok, Kevin William Harpham, Paul Mullet

Category Tags: Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Law Enforcement Actions, Aryan Nations, National Alliance, Bombs and Explosives

Three men are charged with beating two Mexican nationals in San Francisco’s Tenderloin neighborhood in November 2010. The three men, Robert Allen, Anthony Weston, and Justin Meskan, all plead not guilty to assault charges with hate crime enhancements. If convicted, the three face a maximum of 10 years in prison. Allen, Weston, Meskan, and two others attacked two Hispanic men while screaming “White power!” and racial slurs near a Tenderloin bar. The two others involved in the assault remain at large. The five attacked one of the men from behind, knocking him to the ground and beating and kicking him unconscious. The second man tried to intervene, but was himself attacked. Lead prosecutor Victor Hwang says, “We have produced information at the preliminary hearing which links them to groups we believe are white supremacist groups.” District Attorney of San Francisco George Gascon calls the attack “an attack of extreme violence [that] should raise concerns for the entire community.” San Franciso has seen an upswing in hate crimes recently, largely from incidents involving members of white supremacist groups. One of the two victims returned to Mexico after the attack, but the Consulate General of Mexico worked with the district attorney’s office to convince him to return to the US for the duration of the court proceedings. The man’s return to Mexico was due to “concerns about their safety more than concerns about their immigration status,” according to Mexico’s deputy consul general in San Francisco. Gascon says there is “a great likelihood that there are other victims we are not aware of” who have been targeted in a hate crime, and encourages them to come forward regardless of whether they are undocumented. “It’s critically important for people to report these crimes to us,” he says. “Immigration status is not relevant to us in prosecuting these cases.” A source tells a reporter that the charges against Allen, Weston, and Meskan are just “the tip of the iceberg,” and that the FBI and Secret Service are involved with San Francisco police in an investigation which may result in more arrests. [KTVU-TV, 3/17/2011; KGO-TV, 3/17/2011; San Franciso Appeal, 3/17/2011]

Entity Tags: Justin Meskan, Anthony Weston, George Gascon, Victor Hwang, Robert Allen

Category Tags: Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Law Enforcement Actions, Beatings/Mobs

Alleged neo-Nazi Kevin Harpham pleads not guilty to all charges of planting a bomb along the route of a Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade in Spokane (see January 17, 2011 and March 9, 2011), including pleas of not guilty to new “hate crime” charges. Harpham remains in custody without bond. The FBI says it is treating the case as a domestic terrorism incident. New indictments against Harpham charge that he attempted to use the bomb to injure or kill individuals attending the parade because of their “actual or perceived race, color, and national origin.” The bureau also accuses Harpham of seeking to use a destructive device in the furtherance of a hate crime. His trial is set for May 31. [Reuters, 4/25/2011] However, it will be delayed until August 2011. [Spokane Spokesman-Review, 5/21/2011]

Entity Tags: Kevin William Harpham, Federal Bureau of Investigation

Category Tags: Court Actions and Lawsuits, Law Enforcement Actions, Bombs and Explosives

Mark Anthony Stroman on his way to the death chamber.Mark Anthony Stroman on his way to the death chamber. [Source: CBS DFW / London Daily Mail]Mark Anthony Stroman is executed for murdering a store owner he believed to be a Muslim in the days after the 9/11 attacks (see October 4, 2001 and After). A federal judge and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia rejected pleas from one of his victims, Rais Bhuiyan, to spare his life (see September 21, 2001 and (July 18, 2011)). Stroman, then a white supremacist and member of the Aryan Brotherhood, went on a killing spree in the Dallas, Texas, area after the 9/11 attacks, claiming it was his duty as an American to seek revenge for the attacks and citing the death of his sister in the attacks (a claim lawyers and authorities cannot verify). But since Bhuiyan began his attempts to win clemency for Stroman, Stroman claimed his mindset changed. He recently told a reporter, “I was an uneducated idiot back then and now I’m a more understanding human being.” Stroman is pronounced dead from lethal injection at 8:53 p.m. at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Huntsville Unit. From the death chamber, Stroman asked for God’s grace and said hate in the world had to stop. “Even though I lay on this gurney, seconds away from my death, I am at total peace,” he said. “God bless America. God bless everyone.” Turning to the warden, he issues his final words: “Let’s do this damn thing.” [Chicago Tribune, 7/20/2011; CNN, 7/20/2011; Daily Mail, 7/21/2011]

Entity Tags: Mark Anthony Stroman, Antonin Scalia, Aryan Brotherhood, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Rais Bhuiyan

Category Tags: Faith-Based Rhetoric and Actions, Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric, Law Enforcement Actions, Other Militias, Separatists, Shooting/Guns

Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez.Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez. [Source: Washington Post]Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, a young Idaho man who reportedly has an “obsession” with President Obama, fires nine shots at the White House. One of his shots strikes the window of the mansion’s living quarters, but does not break the ballistic glass. Obama and his wife Michelle are on a nine-day Asia-Pacific tour. According to an FBI affidavit, Ortega drives his black 1998 Honda to a location near 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, and fires twice through his passenger window, using a Romanian-made Cugir SA semiautomatic rifle equipped with a telescopic sight. Two motorists witness the shooting. FBI agents search the area around the White House and locate “several confirmed bullet impact points on the south side of the building on or above the second story,” where the First Family’s residential area is located. Officials soon find the Honda abandoned, with the Cugir and boxes of ammunition inside, along with an aluminum baseball bat and a set of brass knuckles. Days later, Pennsylvania law enforcement officials arrest Ortega at an Indiana, Pennsylvania, hotel, after a desk clerk recognizes his photograph from a Secret Service handout. Ortega does not resist arrest, according to a Pennsylvania state trooper. According to the US Park Police, Ortega has known mental health issues, and the Park Police says “Ortega should be considered unstable with violent tendencies.” Apparently Ortega considers Obama “the devil” and “the anti-Christ,” officials say. Authorities say Ortega may believe his attack is part of some divinely inspired mission. Ortega’s family reported him missing on October 31; he was stopped by police in Arlington, Virginia, on the morning of November 11 after the police received reports of a suspicious person, but released because he had apparently committed no crimes. Photographs taken of Ortega during that encounter are later identified as being those of the possible White House shooter. FBI agent Chris Ormerod later discovers that before Ortega left Idaho, he told acquaintances that he “needed to kill” Obama and that he “will not stop until it’s done.” One acquaintance later tells the FBI that Ortega believes the government is “conspiring” against him. He is charged with an attempt to assassinate Obama. Initial media reports deny that Ortega has any connections with radical groups of any kind. [Associated Press, 11/16/2011; Washington Post, 11/17/2011; New York Times, 11/17/2011; US District Court for the District of Columbia, 11/17/2011 pdf file] However, later media investigations will find those reports somewhat superficial, though no official membership in any such groups seems to exist. Ortega is apparently a religious extremist who has embraced a number of “oddball” conspiracy theories, and recently viewed a conspiracy-theory film by Alex Jones, the far-right Internet talk show host. The film Ortega watched is entitled The Obama Deception. Ortega recently posted a YouTube video asking talk show host Oprah Winfrey to allow him to appear on her program because he is the second coming of Jesus Christ. “You see, Oprah, there is still so much more that God needs me to express to the world,” he says on the video. “It’s not just a coincidence that I look like Jesus. I am the modern-day Jesus Christ that you all have been waiting for.” Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, a mental health expert, believes that Ortega may suffer from schizophrenia. “I can guarantee you that in his mind, it all makes perfect sense,” Torrey tells a reporter. “If he’s Christ, Obama’s the Antichrist.” [New York Times, 11/21/2011] Ortega’s mother later denies press reports that her son has any mental issues. [Detroit Free Press, 11/18/2011]

Entity Tags: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Alex Jones, Barack Obama, E. Fuller Torrey, US Secret Service, US Park Police, Chris Ormerod, Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Obama, Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez

Category Tags: Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action, Law Enforcement Actions, Shooting/Guns

Page 3 of 3 (212 events)
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Categories

General

Abortion-Based Rhetoric and Actions (109)Anti-Communist Rhetoric and Actions (5)Anti-Government Rhetoric and Action (548)Anti-Health Care Reform (24)Anti-Semitic Rhetoric and Actions (83)Anti-Tax Rhetoric and Actions (42)Environmental Activism (63)Faith-Based Rhetoric and Actions (102)Gender-Based Rhetoric and Actions (67)Other (6)Race and Ethnic-Based Rhetoric (158)

Interventions

Court Actions and Lawsuits (279)Federal Government Actions (56)Law Enforcement Actions (212)

Organizations

Animal Liberation Front (27)Army of God (21)Aryan Nations (38)Christian Identity (31)Earth Liberation Front (30)Elohim City (24)Ku Klux Klan (16)Michigan Militia (11)Montana Freemen (76)Montana Militia (14)National Alliance (30)Oath Keepers (5)Operation Rescue (18)Other Anti-Abortion Groups (6)Other Environmental Activists (5)Other Militias, Separatists (128)PLAL (6)Posse Comitatus (25)SHAC (10)Stormfront (12)The Order (34)WCOTC (49)Westboro Baptist Church (50)

Specific Events

'Unabomber' Attacks (43)1949 Peekskill Riots (3)1992 Ruby Ridge Standoff (5)1993 Branch Davidian Siege (7)1995 Oklahoma City Bombing (442)2001 Anthrax Attacks (39)2009 Health Care Protests (23)2009 Holocaust Museum Shooting (4)Death of Robert Jay Mathews (5)Eric Rudolph Bombings (15)FACE Law (3)Freemen/FBI Standoff (37)Killing Spree by John Salvi (3)Murder of Alan Berg (3)Murder of Dr. Barnard Slepian (6)Murder of Dr. David Gunn (2)Murder of Dr. George Tiller (17)Murder of Dr. John Britton (4)Shepard/Byrd Hate Crimes Act (7)

Types of Violence

Arson (62)Beatings/Mobs (36)Bioweapon Attacks (43)Bombs and Explosives (328)Harassment and Threats (95)Kidnapping (5)Other Violence (41)Rhetoric from National Figures (45)Rhetorical Violence (218)Robberies, Larcenies, Fraud, Etc. (71)Shooting/Guns (115)Vandalism (19)
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